Friday, June 24, 2011

Flowers & Plants Delivered today!

#4 Corn plant
Don't confuse this plant with the vegetable of the same name. This beautiful houseplant offers variegated leaves and a single upright stem -- so it resembles a decorative corn stalk without the ears. Plant several together in a large container for a fuller appearance.

Here's a tip: If your corn plant grows too tall, cut back the cane to a foot or two above the soil and new shoots to form below the cut.

It bears colorful yellow-and-green-striped straplike leaves on an upright stem.

Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light; 60-75 degrees F.; allow the soil surface to dry between waterings

Size: To 10 feet tall and 3 feet tall

Ponytail Palm

Despite its common name, this plant is a succulent rather than a true palm. Its graceful arching leaves are always attractive and its swollen trunk looks great, too. (The trunk holds moisture for the plant.) Keep your ponytail palm in a container only a couple of inches wider than its trunk base to control its size. It is sometimes sold as Nolina recurvata.

the trunk actually stores moisture, ponytail palm can survive for long periods without watering.

Growing Conditions: Bright light; 65-75 degrees F., 50-55 degrees F. in winter; allow the soil to dry between waterings

Size: To 10 feet tall and 4 feet wide
Rubber Tree

An old-fashioned classic, rubber tree gets its name from the sticky, milky sap it exudes if injured. It eventually grows into a large tree, but you can easily keep it shorter by pruning back long stems, causing it to branch into a multi-stemmed shrub.

Note: In frost-free areas, you may see rubber trees as a full-size shade trees outdoors.

Its big, dark green shiny leaves definitely make a statement. The older plants get, the larger they become -- a good-sized rubber tree makes a big, dramatic accent in any room.

Growing Conditions: Medium to bright light; 60-80 degrees F.; allow the soil surface to dry between waterings

Size: To 8 feet tall and 4 feet wide